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dvesilly
dvesilly's picture
Used Norwood's for sale

Hi, this is my first post in the forum, although I have been reading them for quite some time. I am in the market for a sawmill to begin a SMALL scale operation. I work for a tree service and have a steady supply of wood here in Western PA. I was wondering why I am not seeing any used Norwood mills for sale on any of the internet selling sites? I see plenty of mills from other manufacturers. Also, have any of you bent the side rails when rolling logs onto the mill or turning the cants. The Norwood fits into my budget, as I really don't need all the bells and whistles of a hydraulic mill. Thank-you for reading my post and I appreciate the wisdom and experience that you may share.

hashhu
hashhu's picture

"Glad I bought a NW"
This was going to be a new post, but added to this post.

This morning I went to watch a friends $8,600.00 sawmill he bought last week. Very nice looking unit. B&S 23 hp , cut up to 36" logs. We put a 17"x 12' Oak log on it. First log, first cut. Told him to keep the first cut and nail it up inside his building.

First cut, aprox 2" thick slab right though it, rolled it over, I am suprise we didn't break something. The support legs on this unit are (looks) 6' apart and that log when rolled moved (shooked) the whole track assembly. After squaring this moster log, we where ready to cut some 2x12.
With a 12" cant, made the almost two minute cut and never seen so much head shaking, it wasn't are heads either. Push a few inches, stop and go. This sawmill, I wouldn't give $1,500 for it. The post are 1 1/2 x 1 1/2, but a Pretty red color.

After milling 4 logs, I told him, take it back and go with the one I got (brand), he seen mine operate a few time last year and like it.
I told him to use the slabs, waste and first slab for firewood.

So a lesson learn for my friend, save very little and got nothing.
If you are looking on buying a new or used mill, go with a brand that been used by other members.

Robert in W. Mi.
Robert in W. Mi.'s picture

Quote:
I have seen quite a few of them listed, and there was a LumberMate 2000 with a 13HP Honda engine listed in Washington, VA just a week or two ago, which was posted to another forum, and a guy drove down and got it from NY. It was listed for $2400, not sure what he got it for.

I know you keep calling it a 2000 for $2400, but are you SURE it was a 2000? I'm thinking it wasn't...

They all are Lumbermates, but they all aren't 2000's.

Robert

dvesilly
dvesilly's picture

Thanks guys. Norwood mills (even new) seem to offer the best "bang for the buck". This is a large investment for me, and I want to make sure I spend wisely. Your comments are putting me at ease and making a Norwood mill an obvious choice.

PWS
PWS's picture

I just Googled the Lumbermate from Washington, VA. It was a Mark IV.

Pete Schiller
Freedom, NH

LATHAM FARMS
LATHAM FARMS's picture

HI DVESILLY. I SEARCHED OUT MILLS FOR A LONG TIME BEFORE I BOUGHT MY 2000. LIKE YOU IT WAS A HUGE INVESTMENT FOR ME TO JUSTIFY. I BOUGHT MINE NEW AND ADDED A LOT OF OPTIONS THAT WERE WAY OVER PRICED, BUT I AM VERY HAPPY WITH THE UNIT. NORWOOD HAD A PROGRAM THAT IF YOU CALLED THEM THEY COULD SET YOU UP WITH SOMEONE IN YOUR AREA AND YOU COULD GO AND SEE THIER MILL IN ACTION. THATS WHAT I DID. I DONT KNOW IF THEY STILL DO THAT OR NOT, MABE SOMETHING FOR YOU TO LOOK INTO. WHEN YOU BUY A MILL THEY SET YOU UP FOR THAT IF YOU WANT. I SIGNED UP FOR IT BUT HAVE NEVER GOTTEN ANY CALLS.
ALL IN ALL FOR THE MONEY A LM2OOO IS A VERY GOOD BUY, THE CHEAP MILLS AND MILLS IN THAT PRICE RANGE DEFFINATELY DONT COMPAIR.

J R in Missouri
J R in Missouri's picture

Hi dvesilly,
I have a Lumbermate Mark IV, Purchase new in the year 2000. I have used and abused as both portable and stationary.

You ask about bent rails. Nope No bends, Large oak logs that need chainsaw work for the first and second slab cuts. Turn logs with winch usally, have dropped logs with bad bucket chain hitch from a track loader etc.

Did have a real butt puker when placing a large oak log on saw bed. Using a 1040C Case track loader I turn one track into the rail and begin to climb over top of mill. :(

Case weighs in at 24,000 pound. Witness by two screaming indivuals. (Thank goodness) :o I was surprise as where they. I did get a bow in mill bed but no bend. Most damage was a scared bolt head. Have put more damage to log post supports from blade contact.

We Set the mill back on the blocking, level it, Loosen a few bolts, stretched electric fence wire from end to end to make the sure rails were straight. Switched the contacting plates, tighten same and all done. No pounding of metal, no cutting or welding. No waiting for factory tech support, Just a couple of kick my butt moments!

So, did I have a bend Nope, Just pushed mill sideways and put in a really, really bad bow, (at that moment) in the middle of sawbed rails. That was about 6 years ago. Still the perfect mill.

My opinnion is if you find a Norwood Lumbermate Mark IV with a 20 horse engine and bed extensions for $5500.00 Buy it. :D

J R

Greenthumb
Greenthumb's picture

should i  start with a small mill then work my way up or just go for the big one ?

 

swampbuggy
swampbuggy's picture

Greenthumb, welcome to the forum. Have you ever milled before? What are you planning to do with your sawn lumber? These are a couple of questions you need to answer before making your choice. Dan

Greenthumb
Greenthumb's picture

Swamp buggy . Thanks for your advise and no I haven't milled before only when a kind fella by the name of  William gave me a demo on his MX34 that was it I was hooked . I plan on using the material to make tables and need widths around 16 to 20 " and lengths about 10 ' that would be perfect  . I now use reclaimed material from old barns and and other sources and need it kiln dried .I run into a lot of material that has nails and I know that I can purchase cobolt blades through Noorwood but my thought is to go another rout and start milling my own lumber . I already have a store open in Hudson NY and have a good clientele so I think this will work well with the kiln drying also . Looking to build my own solar kiln to keep that cost down also .Give me your thoughts thanks . Greenthumb .

 

 

 

 

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

Greenthumb, welcome to the forum!  Since you make furniture, you might consider the extra width you can get from the MX34.  I cut a lot of flitches and having 28" cut width and the 23 h.p. engine option have been very useful.  There are also hydraulic upgrades for the MX34 (soon to be HD36) so you can retrofit hydrauilcs instead of buying a new sawmill.  My experience has been that whatever I am milling on (the MX34 is my third mill), I push it to the limit on log size.  Both Norwood mills are great, but if you can justify the extra money, go with the bigger one.  I think that the idea of learning on a manual sawmill has its merits.  I have had good luck with Norwood's cobalt tipped bandsaw blades in nails, but prefer the standard blades for most cutting.  A good metal detector will come in handy.  Solar kiln is a good way to go, but make sure that the slow cycle times meet your needs.

Greenthumb
Greenthumb's picture

Thanks oakie  Greenthumb here I will be milling 16 to 20 " and 10 to 12 '  you still think I should go with the MX34 ?

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

Greenthumb, those logs will go on the ML26 with no problem.  I'd still opt for the bigger engine, though.  That's assuming you're in reasonably good shape and won't be looking for hydraulics any time soon.  Get a couple of good cant hooks & you'll be good to go!

Greenthumb
Greenthumb's picture

Thanks oakie I still have some life left in me I'm 43 and still have a good back . Now all I have to do is convince my father that its a good investment PLEASE  Help . I think that once  people hear through word of mouth they will find me or I will find them .what can I say to make him a believer ? Thanks 

 

llamaman
llamaman's picture

hello Greenthumb,   I have a new mx34 with a 23 briggs sitting on  saw horses in my garage right now.  I bought it this winter and took a couple weekends to assemble.

                                 By assembling your mill, you will know every nut, bolt and adjustment. I too had a hard time deciding which model to buy. Price was a factor, but when

                                  my son said, Dad, you'll never say, I wish I bought the smaller unit with less hp. That sold me. Going to try to set it up on my frame work this week and

                                  saw my first board. I'll try to post some pics.                            Mark

Dewchie
Dewchie's picture

Mark that makes alot of sense unless your finances get in the way because you want to buy a tractor etc. I bought the ML26 and some of the decision was financial so I could get a tractor etc. etc. But also because for me the mill could cut the size logs I need to build many many projects, furniture, decks, buildings etc. I think if you cut the wood green you will need less horsepower and still get a great job done, as long as you don't need it for production. Still you can make money.

Greenthumb, We all love horsepower but is it practical to have it. At least that is how I made my decision convincing my wife.

Steve

Bill
Bill's picture

Mark waiting here with anticipation for the pics. laugh.

 Bill

Greenthumb
Greenthumb's picture

Thanks  guys all your feedback comes in very handy and both make allot of sence . I guess it boiles down to the bottom line when . I will keep you posted hopefully soon . 

llamaman
llamaman's picture

as long as you go with Norwood, you'll make a good investment!

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

Well said, llamaman.  Either would be a great investment.  If money is no object, the bigger sawmill is the way to go.  Back to reality... you'll need a good chain saw, cant hooks, and extra band saw blades.  Tractor with a front end loader would also be handy.  Is your Dad on board yet?  Take him for a walk through the woods and point out the trees that would be good candidates for milling.  Does he need lumber for building or woodworking projects?  Keep us posted.

Greenthumb
Greenthumb's picture

I would like to use the mill to make a good chunk of cash for the both of us . I just need to convince him that it would be a good investment . 

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

Sounds like you and your dad will be in partnership with the mill.  What have you done toward making a business plan?  Have you talked to any potential customers to see what they might be looking for?  Where will your wood come from?  Do you have a handle on taxes & insurance?  The successful sawyers I know keep a pretty close eye on the business end of things, even though they'd rather be out sawing.  This might help convince your dad that the mill is a good investment.

Dewchie
Dewchie's picture

Well Greenthumb, I know how you feel. I have been down that road a couple of times myself as I'm sure we all have. Remember that phrase " nothing ventured nothing gained". I feel mine will pay for itself because I will make my lumber for my house porch, woodshed and wood shop. As neighbours see they will ask. Need some faith and things will come together. Though I can only work on the mill on weekends, it will take time. Being in the outdoors cutting is not work for me it is a piece of mind. When you love what you do it's not work. When it's not work then the cash will flow. (Herd that some where?)

 

Cheers!

Greenthumb
Greenthumb's picture

Thanks Dewchie you made a good point some day I will own a Noorwood mill it's a must have product will keep you posted . Thanks 

Greenthumb
Greenthumb's picture

Thanks Dewchie you made a good point some day I will own a Noorwood mill it's a must have product will keep you posted . Thanks 

Greenthumb
Greenthumb's picture

Thanks Dewchie you made a good point some day I will own a Noorwood mill it's a must have product will keep you posted . Thanks 

Greenthumb
Greenthumb's picture

dont know what happened there laugh

Greenthumb
Greenthumb's picture

Okie I have not discussed the tax or insurance plans with him yet but that might push him away further . He might just look at that as onotheronother exexpenceexpence thanks 

 

lardog
lardog's picture

Hello dvesilly,

 

I bought my mid-sized portable Norwood Sawmill (ML-26) about four years ago and used it steady for about four to five months. I experienced no problems with it and it was a pleasure to operate. I have a small piece of property loaded with Ponderosa pine trees that were being destroyed by pine beetles and other tree killing wood borers. I had plans to buy some timber to keep busy after I cleaned up my property. To keep a long story short I have extensive medical bills and must sell my beloved sawmill. I want to sell it as quickly as possible at a reasonable price. I ordered it directly from Buffalo, NY. and the shipping cost was about $800.00. It took me three days to put it together and as previously stated it has been a joy to operate. I also bought a blade sharpener that I would like to sell with it. 

I have a small New Holland front end loader to load my logs onto the bunks. A few times I have misjudged the distance and have slightly bent a rail. The first time it worried me but the rail was easily straightened. This mill is truly a well manufactured piece of machinery.

If you are interested in purchasing my mill please call me. I will set a log on the mill and video the mill in action. I look forward to hearing from you.  

Again, I am only selling my mill to pay for unexpected medical expenses.  I will consider reasonable offers.

 

Larry C. Brown

Yreka, CA

(530) 842-1143

[email protected] 

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

Sounds like you have two tasks; getting the mill, but first convincing you dad to invest.

For the second thing on the list, the fact that Norwood mills compare very favorably with other mills (more value for the dollar invested, as well as continued durability and value down the road) should help.

Other resources could be:

  • Check with a local community college business instructor to see if a student may be interested in assisting in creating a business plan for school credit
  • Check with local universities with a forestry program, to see if a forestry student needs a project evaluating the business model you are looking for)
  • Check with the SBA (Small Business Administration) to see if they have any resources to assist (sometimes they can help with the business plan; over the years, I have seen them be very helpful, and sometimes not very helpful at all. It depends on what their current focus is)

Good luck!

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

Larry, sorry to hear about your medical expenses, and that you're putting the sawmill up for sale.  That must be one of many tough decisions for you.   Best of luck, and please drop in on the forum from time to time.  I hope things turn around for you.

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