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H.carrier
H.carrier's picture
Accumulating logs

Hi all,I just recently purchased a Sawmill,where I have it I have lake on one side and partially surrounded by Park,my question is do I need a permit to remove logs from the lake or outside of the park boundary,there is no active logging in my area,I have looked in the government website but to avail cound not find anything......I'm in British Columbia........Thanks 

Bill
Bill's picture

Nice pic. Henry but I don't see you in it smiley.

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

As long as you've got a flashlight and a real quiet chain saw, you don't need no stinkin' permit angry.  Seriously, get an answer... in writing... before you move anything off of land you don't own.  A few years ago, I had someone call me about selling a walnut log in their yard.  Before I cut it (thankfully), I found out they were just renting the place.  Here in Missouri, if you illegally cut one someone else's property, you pay them 3x the going value of the logs.

Bill MacLellan
Bill MacLellan's picture

Here in NS, you could loose you mill, truck, chainsaw and anything else you happen to have on site at the time you are caught. But we have a system where you can apply to cut on crown land and pay stumpage. A little red tape, but I don't think it is all that bad.

Baron
Baron's picture

Bill how does that work. Can you drive right on with your equipment or does soil conservation service get involved to determine that?

Bill MacLellan
Bill MacLellan's picture

It works as simple as it sounds once you have the permit in hand. There are rules and regulations you need to follow such as no cutting within 75 feet of a water course, insuring all brush and leaners are on the ground and cut up, I think, less than 4 feet. You are inspected during and after the cutting has been done and you need to pass that and or correct any issues. It is all based on the permit you have and the type of cut bogs and bushes want performed in the area. Once you have harvested the trees according to the permit from Natural resources they will cruze the area and calculate the stumpage. Or they will do the calculation prior to. There are also areas where heavy logging has taken place and the pubic is allowed to go in and collect wood after the operation has moved out. You can collect some good logs in the area as well as usually a good supply of available fire wood, mostly from the landing area. This has become more and more rare because bio-mass wood has become valuable as well. In many cases everything is gone brush and all. Not that I agree with that for several reasons.

Baron
Baron's picture

It seems like there is a reasonable system in place. You mentioned that they cruze afterward and tabulate your bill. Did you mean that or is there a way that they can cruze beforehand so that you know what you're getting into?

Bill MacLellan
Bill MacLellan's picture

Yes they cruze before hand so they know and you know. I have never actually held a permit but have been involved through others so my knowledge is limited to it. No permit need for collecting from shut down cutting operations though, that's for wood that is on the ground only.

Bill
Bill's picture

In BC you can't haul anything longer than 2' without a timber mark on it even off private property. This way if your stopped they know where it came from and if it was stolen or not. 

Baron
Baron's picture

Wow. No honor system there. Are the correct officials relatively available or do you have to plan pretty far ahead?  I guess the system is working. How does thAt affect you on your own property Bill. Can u do whatever u want as long as you don't leave your  own property?  Do you need a mark if you are selling finished lumber?

Bill
Bill's picture

To sell lumber you must register with provincial  gov. to collect and pay the taxs GST 5% and PST 7%. I had a timber mark when I sold a few logs but don't think it's still in effect. I was going to get a wood lot at one time but they tell you how much to harvest and to do so I would need close to a million in equipment and I had no desire to work that hard. In the end I would end up with not a lot of money and a pile of used equipment. Also you are depending the mill to pay you for the logs and some mills have so many restrictions they end up giving you far less than quoted. You are also governed by the market that fluctuates a lot. Far better off to just go contract logging and make a few thou. per day .

Baron
Baron's picture

Wow bill it seems like allot of work. So when you go to sell your own boards do they require anything of you?

H.carrier
H.carrier's picture

Hi guys,this sort of answers my question on the land part....but what about removing logs with or without root balls from a lake? A couple of people I have talked to say it's fair game....

Bill
Bill's picture

Henry I'd haul them out in a heart beat .

Bill MacLellan
Bill MacLellan's picture

I would as well, just don't advertise it, I am sure environment would have some say in it.

logbuilder
logbuilder's picture

I tried to acquire a cutting licence here in Northwestern Ontario Canada last year so I could get a small wood lot, so I could come and get logs anytime I needed them. Well here is how it went (I should point out that our stumpage fee is that you pay for the amoount of bush cord you get $35/cord). They told me they don't have any small lots and that I should go and talk to a logging operator and buy from them, that is as far as I got with the government. I checked with a few operators most of them wouldn't give me the time of day and the others wanted a $100 to $150 per cord and you took what they gave you and a lot of it is just simple firewood.

Now I just advertize in our local classifies I'll help clear or cut down large trees to open up the canopy and my price the saw logs. I get a few calls each year to keep me busy.

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