9 posts / 0 new
Last post
sawdoc
sawdoc's picture
Campground Logs

A commercial campground cut down numerous Engelmann spruce to improve the camp sites. There was not enough volume for a log truck load and the owner asked me if I could remove the logs. I had done several favors for the Lumberjack Team at the local college and I enlisted their help in bucking, loading and hauling 8' spruce logs. I'll use ring-centered sawing techniques to saw these logs into fence boards with my Norwood mill. When you have a half dozen 20 year-olds, who needs a loader:)

Sawdoc

Bill
Bill's picture

Nice pics. Sawdoc .

Bill MacLellan
Bill MacLellan's picture

Looks like it was a lot of work, but fun as well. That log dolly looks like it is a great back saver, first time I have seen a pic of someone using one. Sawdoc for us new guys, what is ring-centered sawing?

sawdoc
sawdoc's picture

Hi Bill,

Several years ago I posted a discussion on ring centered sawing of softwoods. Twisting and warping of softwood boards can be strongly affected by how the boards are sawn relative to the log growth rings. This link should display that post. http://forum.norwoodsawmills.com/forestry-and-sawing-forum/ring-centered-sawing

Bob

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

Nice!  Looks like a VA Tech solar kiln in the third photo.  How's it working for you?

Bill MacLellan
Bill MacLellan's picture

Doc, Thanks for the info. I read your past post that you gave the link to, great instruction's. I guess I have been doing ring centered sawing on some hemlock and spruce and did not know it. Any other post of that nature or otherwise bring it on I'm thirsty for the knowledge. I understand "I think" your madness for sawing 1 5/8's that way things match up to factory wood?

Thanks again.

sawdoc
sawdoc's picture

Hi Post Oakie - I purchased the plans for my solar kiln from Wood Magazine way back in 1994. In their plans, they don't give credit to anybody for the design except the draftsman. I always thought that the design concept came from some of the work done at the Forest Sciences Lab in Madison, Wisconsin. Over the years, I have been pleased with the kiln, although I do like the VT design for loading, With mine, all loading is by hand and one board at a time. In the middle of a Montana summer, I have dried a thousand bdft of sugar maple to 6% in 30 days. When I take the wood out of the kiln, it will regain moisture.

A number of years ago, I adapted the kiln to serve as a late winter/early spring greenhouse. This required that I install a 24" square window opening that automatically opens as the temperature rises. I also installed a large exhaust fan that is thermostaticly controlled. Without these running, the kiln gets too hot for plants. Last fall I cut a small batch of thicker slabs of elm and birch to use in wood turning and didn't get it out of the kiln before I needed to start germinating seeds for the garden. So, right now, the kiln is doubling both as a wood kiln and a greenhouse.

Bob

Bill
Bill's picture

Nice building Bob. I would like a  kiln and my wife a green house unfortunately do to terrain I have difficulty with a dual purpose which makes good sense. If age doesn't catch up to me I may get them done yet.

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

Hmmm... looks like you could add plastic on the lower part of the kiln to cover the area where you have the potted plants on the outside.  I'm thinking of bowed PVC.  Then maybe roofing painted black tacked to the wood siding to help heat things up.  Gotta keep mama happy!

Facebook icon
Twitter icon
LinkedIn icon
YouTube icon