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mountaindog
mountaindog's picture
Skidding Rope

Anybody using Rope to drag logs out of the woods? I have allot of ash logs in a hollow that I need to drag up to the road. I have a winch on my pickup and plenty of chain but I was thinking a heavy rope would be easier to manage than numerous chains. I see ropes on Ebay with strengths of 6000 to 10,000 lb. Is that enough?

Bill MacLellan
Bill MacLellan's picture

Mountaindog, I have used rope a lot over the years, sometimes you just gotta do with what you have at hand to reach some of those spot's. I have had good luck so far. But be very cautious, rope has a lot of stretch, and when it breaks, it's going to come at you with a vengeance. It may not be the best idea for your windshield either. I use 1/2" fall arrest ropes that are out of service I get from work. Like I said they work but demand respect.

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

Might look at Amsteel.  I haven't tried it, yet, but intend to soon.  It is low stretch, and the 3/8" diameter is rated 19,600 pounds.  Not cheap, though.  On the plus side, it is flexible, won't hurt your hands, lightweight & doesn't kink.  On the negative side, it can be cut if pulled over a sharp edge.  Here's a link: http://www.samsonrope.com/Pages/Product.aspx?ProductID=872

mountaindog
mountaindog's picture

I'll look into that Post Oakie, thanks. Abrasion is what I was concerned with. Here's one I found on Ebay http://www.ebay.com/itm/9-16-White-Stable-Braid-Double-Braid-Bull-Rope-by-Samson-Synthetic-Line-/261683431463?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3ced8c4827 it's rated at 13,300 lbs.

sawwood
sawwood's picture

i have the Amsteel cable on both of our winchs. Works real good and have not any trouble. As for draging logs i bought a 3/4 off ebay that is real good.

 

Sawwood

Baron
Baron's picture

Having been an arborist of one sort or another most of my life I tend to prefer rope over cable. Switch ends often and trim ends shorter when abraded badly. Look for low stretch styles. The Samson bull rope that you show above is nice and 13,000 lbs is appropriate. Samson is a great company and an industry standard. Use a timer-hitch on the log and a triple bowline on the tow vehicle. Don't use metal clevis' with rope as they can become deadly missiles when something goes wrong. If you elect to buy a three strand rope they can be eye-spliced and back-spliced to make harnesses and cradles. Its a dying art but fun to learn.

I really like Capstans (rope winches) but they are almost gone from business today.....except in marine industries.  

Keep us posted MountainDog! 

mountaindog
mountaindog's picture

Thanks Baron. I ordered the Samson Rope on Ebay. Should be here by next Wed. I researched the Timber Hitch and Triple Bowline knots. Look simple enough.

I agree, A capstan winch would be nice. Especially a PTO or Hydraulic driven 3 point mount. Every one I have found however is quite expensive.....at least for now.

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

I haven't tried it with logs, but I have tried it with my 1800 pound Polaris; using multiple ropes to pull something up a hill. I use one as a primary one to hold the weight, then a second one to pull against the primary, and it gives me enough leverage that I can pull much easier. Kind of like a rope fulcrum.

Nick C
Nick C's picture

Hello All!

This is actually my first post, although I have been reading through all of the topics and gaining lots of good information since joining not too long ago.

mountaindog - Next time you see a bucket truck for the cable company or phone company stopped somewhere, ask them who you could talk to that would be able to get you some strand and a few pre-forms.

Strand is the high tensile galvanized cable that is used to support aerial cables on the poles and is extremely strong. The pre-forms wrap around it to give you a loop to attach a chain to. Hopefully you will run into someone nice enough to just give it to you since it is relatively inexpensive material.

That is what I use to pull trees around my farm and it works great!

Hope that offers an idea to all...... 

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

Nick, welcome to the forum!  Thanks for posting, sounds like you've got a lot of good practical experience.  Are you running a sawmill or thinking about getting one?  Where are you located?

Nick C
Nick C's picture

I am right at the stage of pulling the trigger to get my first sawmill. I have been on the fence between Woodmizer and Norwood and leaning heavily towards the LM29. I see you have one so any advise you can give me would be greatly appreciated. My only concern with Norwood is the horsepower offered...is it enough? and what motor is the best (or what do you have and are you satisfied with it?

I am located in east Tennessee and have 13 acres which has a good amount of trees, however I have access to almost all the trees I could ever want. I burn firewood for my primary heat source and enjoy every aspect of logging in general. I have wanted a sawmill for years and have not lost interest so it is time.

What do you use your sawmill for primarily? Like I said before, any advice would be great!

 

smithbr
smithbr's picture

Hi Nick

I have an earlier version of the LM29, the LL26, with a 13 hp Honda engine.  Sawing 14" red oak is do-able, though the motor is certainly working, and I'm not able to push the carriage through as quickly as I can on 24" white pine.  But for a hobby, it's quite acceptable.  If I was sawing daily, or trying to make money, I wouldn't advise it.

Just my $0.02

Blair Smith

 

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

The 13 hp Honda is a great little engine but, as smithbr says, takes longer on the tougher logs.  Keep a sharp blade on it and don't push to hard, and it will cut anything you can get on the sawmill.  The things about Norwood that I really like are that the frame is rigid and the carriage has a solid feel to it.  Clamping system works very well, and the mill throws the sawdust away from the side you walk on.  Since you build the mill yourself, I think you get more machine for your money.  If you're concerned about the power, the HD36 (which I use) might be a better option.  Whatever you get, buy the biggest engine available.  All this may sound like an advertisement but hey, this is the Norwood forum, and we love our mills!

Nick C
Nick C's picture

Thank y'all for your input, and that pretty well sums it up. I am going for the LM29 with the 16hp B&S (because hey...everyone needs ANOTHER battery to maintain right!) 

I will be using it mainly to mill lumber for my personal use, however I also want to maybe make a few dollars here and there by selling some lumber and milling for others onsite. Without the trailer package I could see it being cumbersome to load and unload the mill, but I am sure I will figure something out.

I will be ordering my mill tomorrow so wish me luck and thanks again to all for the advise! 

Bill
Bill's picture

Best of luck Nick looking forward to seeing your pics. and hearing your story's.

Bill MacLellan
Bill MacLellan's picture

Nick C, I have the LM29 with the 14 Kohler and I love it. I'm in it for the enjoyment and my own use so production is not as important to me. I have been very pleased to date. Are you wanting to transport it? if so the trailer package is well worth it as well as the auto water system.

Enjoy

LATHAM FARMS
LATHAM FARMS's picture

Welcome Nick !!!! dont worry about another battery to maintain, im sure you can handle it ! we have 19 to care for here on the farm.... im the poster child for excide batteries. with moast of them at over a hundred a crack.

mountaindog
mountaindog's picture

Got my rope yesterday and got time to try it out today. Works good. The timber hitch knot on the log end is easy to tie and holds great. Its the other end I'm having issues with. I'm using my front end loader on my tractor to pull logs. I'm setting up on a road reaching down into the hollow that is just a bit to steep to take the tractor down into. With chains its fast and easy especially when I have a helper to reposition the chain after each pull. The rope gives me longer reach and less weight to carry to the log but takes to much time to retie after each pull. Can someone recommend a faster knot to tie on the loader end. I use a short chain on the bucket so the rope wont get damaged by the cutting edge of the bucket so I could tie off to a clevis on the end of the chain..

Bill
Bill's picture

I never use rope but if I did something like a cam that tighens when you pull on it and just pull the other end to release would be something I'd consider.

Baron
Baron's picture

Anchor cleats work well in conjunction with open fairleads. A trailer ball may work also. 

mountaindog
mountaindog's picture

Ya got me thinking Baron. its raining cats and dogs here today so I think a trip to the local marina might be in order.

Baron
Baron's picture

Do you have two hooks on the top of the loader bucket ?  If so just bolt a large anchor cleat in between them. 

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

I use a trucker's hitch quite a bit; one of my favorite knots. With some ropes, it slips, but with decent tying rope, it holds well and is very quick to untie.

http://www.paddling.net/sameboat/archives/sameboat200.html

 

Baron
Baron's picture

Roland,

The truckers hitch is what we use to to tie down items like canoes on roof racks and so forth. My kids and I love it but it would tighten too much if dragging heavy items. Thanks for reminding us of it.

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

If you have a heavy bar that you can wrap the rope around several times, then just hold onto the rope as you pull (sort of like a capstan) or wrap the rope under itself you won't have to get off the tractor to pull in the slack.  I do that with my old Ford 8N, and will probably rig up something similar for my "new" Case-IH 485.  Only problem is that it sometimes takes three hands.

Bill MacLellan
Bill MacLellan's picture

You can go to a safety shop or a contractor friend that uses these rope grabs. They are used in fall arrest and are fairly cheap. I get them from my work place once in a while when they no longer pass inspection. They hold a pile of weight and run up or down a rope very easily a quick.

 

 

Baron
Baron's picture

Those are cool. I like to simplicity of  clearing too. 

mountaindog
mountaindog's picture

Here's just a small sample of the ash logs waiting to be milled on my HD36.

mountaindog
mountaindog's picture

My mill

Bill
Bill's picture

Nice looking pile of logs and a very nice mill looks like you'll be having fun slicing up that ash.

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

Looks good.  My ash pile is the result of burning firewood smiley.  I also use the winch & ramps to get logs up on my mill, but I did swap out the boat winch for a 12 Volt winch, which saves a LOT of grunt work.  What are you going to do with all that lumber???

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