You are here

40 posts / 0 new
Last post
otherguy
otherguy's picture
blade sharpening

2 Questions:
How many times can a blade be sharpened?

How easy is to use the Norwood sharpener and tooth setter?

Bill
Bill's picture

How many times a blade can be sharpened depends on many variables I think it would be safe to say at least 1/2 a doz. times if your easy on your blades most likely more. I've never used their setter but have the original sharpener and like most things there's a learning curve. Once you have the technique very easy.
Bill

otherguy
otherguy's picture

wow just 6 times maybe a few more, guess that just seems like a lot if you have to change blades after every log, but maybe you can go a little longer than just 1 log. I can see why people suggest to order 10 or so to have on hand.

Daffyd
Daffyd's picture

Blade sharpening varies based on a number of variables. The most extreme I had was 14 sharpenings but generally 6 to 8 is more likely. I used to mark blades with punch marks each time they were sharpened and set. It was interesting to see the results with different blades. I have since given up this practice and sharpen and set until the blade breaks.
Daffyd

Bill
Bill's picture

If your logs are clean and green not dried out hard fir like many I saw you can saw 3 or 4 hrs. on a blade 1/2 doz. to a doz.logs depending on size. The first 10 blades I bought with the mill were .032 and I sharpen all but 2 of them 15 and 16 times. With the .042 blades I've not had as much luck.
Bill

hamish24
hamish24's picture

I have found that with the standard Norwood sharpener (the dremel one), so long as I am prudent and swap out bands at the first sign of becoming dull, I can sharpen and set in excess of 20 times. Taking the extra time when sharpening to ensure the gullet gets ground makes a huge difference.

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

I recently set up the sawmill BladeMate Pro band saw blade sharpener. It takes a bit to get used to, and it pays to practice on a few old blades first. My only question is "why didn't I start sharpening my own blades sooner?" It gives great results and follows the profile of the blade so you always have a consistent gullet. Best of all, I don't have to put off a cutting job until blades get back from a sharpening service. Only real problem was when I tried to sharpen a 3/4" pitch blade with the 7/8" cam. I understand Norwood has a 3/4" cam available now. Pretty soon, I'll put a drive motor on it.

Good judgement comes from experience... experience comes from bad judgement.

Bill
Bill's picture

Looks good Dave do you have to dress the wheel? It is nice to have sharp blades all the time I generally run 5 blades at a time so sharpening doesn't get to be to big a chore.

Bill

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

Good question. So far, I've just been eyeballing the stone to see that it is flat on the side that touches the tip of the tooth. I've only sharpened a couple dozen. What is your recommendation?

Good judgement comes from experience... experience comes from bad judgement.

Bill
Bill's picture

Dave I have the original with a dremel tool that's why I was wondering if the stone on the mew model had to be dressed.If so I would be interested in a diamond stone to avoide having to keep dressing the stone.

Bill

eddiemac
eddiemac's picture

The grinding wheel should be dressed every so often in order to maintain a proper blade profile. The left corner of the wheel does the most grinding and requires the most maintenance. The radius there determines the shape of the gullet, and if it gets too big will start wearing into the tooth face, decreasing the hook angle. On my Woodmizer sharpener, they recommend grinding the right half of the wheel at the same angle as the back of the teeth. It takes a bit of experimentation to learn how to sharpen, and then if you wait long enough between sharpenings you get to learn all over again.

sawwood
sawwood's picture

I sharpened our blades for the first time Saturday. I had trouble getting the setting wright so the gullet
and back of the tooth where ground ok. JR has the dermal sharpener and I found that the setting for the stone
made the most different. The book called for 4.5" from the stone to the sharpener but that didn't work out. So
with some adjusting I found the right setting. After that it only took about 5 or 10 min to sharpen a blade.
There where 3 blades that I had a sharping co do and they put a diff profile on them so it took 5 rounds to
put the blade back to the Norwood profile. I sure do enjoy doing all the work that goes into sawmill work.
now if the weather would stop raining I can mill some walnut logs we have.

Sawwood

kirk
kirk's picture
Hi Eddiemac what woodmizer sharpener did you purchase i am looking at buying that new one the bms25. I have a woodland saw mill sharpener.
eddiemac
eddiemac's picture
Sorry, I just saw your question. I have an old Woodmizer LTAGA drag sharpener that I bought used off the Sawmill Exchange.
Bill
Bill's picture

Eddie that learning all over again put a smile on my face as there are a no. of things in my business as well as sawing and the sharpening I seem to be constantly learning all over again.
Sawwood I found it usually takes a few sharpenings before I'm getting the profile right into the gullet. I try and just brush the front of the tooth down into the gullet and up the back. I also found setting the stone accordingly helps.
Bill

gus
gus's picture

This is an interesting thread. When I bought my LM2000 I got 26 blades, sharpener & setter along with it. This is something I'll need to be studying and practicing.

eddiemac
eddiemac's picture

Gus, I accidentally sent you a private message yesterday saying my post above did not apply to the Dremel sharpener, but only to wheel-type sharpeners. The forum denied me access to your responding message and, I guess, you couldn't read mine either. Anyway -- much to do about nothing.

gus
gus's picture

I was actually able to read your PM last night. One of the things I found interesting about this thread was the fact that there are two different sharpeners. I wasn't aware of that. Mine is, of course, the older Dremel variety. I got it and the setting tool with the mill when I bought it.

Dave142
Dave142's picture

I think it would be a great idea if Norwood would set up a training session on sharpening, we all seem to learn by trial and error, and who knows if we actually ever get it right.
It would be in every ones best interest to spend time learning to do it right, and would be a great occasion for us to meet and share our experiences together….
Ideally they could have someone going to different regions during the year to give as many people as possible access to this type of training...

What say you :) ???

Bill
Bill's picture

Dave I think it would be an expensive venture for Norwood and take a lot of time and effort to set up and have to have a minimum ammount of partisipents each location. The only way to help insure good turn outs would be an up front fee in advance and I'm not so sure how that would go over. Just my thoughts on the suggestion.

Bill

eddiemac
eddiemac's picture

In a more perfect world, Dave, that might happen. More likely if we're lucky, they'll put up a YouTube video. There's probably some sharpening demonstrations available from other sources on the internet now. The Suffolk Machinery/Timberwolf catalog has some good information in their free catalog.

Dave142
Dave142's picture

I agree it probably won't happen, but it sure would be nice to have a hands on training , For myself, I am more visual, and learn better when I see something up close and in person. Too bad there isn't someone out there offering some training in sharpening, blades, knives , chainsaw, chisels, etc etc…..
I don't want to dump all the responsibility on Norwood, but at the wood fairs it would be a great attraction and PR to have someone to show us who are interested, also would be a great selling tool for their products…
I am just thinking out loud,, it happens to me when I have been outside cutting in the hot sun LOL...

gus
gus's picture

I think doing @ the woods fairs is an excellent idea. If they are showing mills anyway it would be to their advantage to extend the mill demonstration to an evening sharpening & setting demo too.

Bill
Bill's picture

Dave 142 I understand your anxiety when there's a learning curve involved. Monkey with the sharpener it's not as complicated as it appears when you first start using it adjust it until the stone runs lightly up the back of the tooth
and as deep into the gullet as it allows you may have to sharpen a few times before it does the whole gullet. Once you become competent if you like you can adjust it to kiss the face of the tooth as well when you sharpen but this can lead to a few mishaps and probably not necessary for a sharp blade. I general use five blades and sharpen them always at the same time this saves adjusting for each blade. Hope this builds a little confidence for you happy sharpening.I only set the blades after a few sharpening s 3 or 4 should maybe do it after 2 or 3 as far as setting goes I'm still learning.
Bill

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

I don't think Norwood could have a functional way to demonstrate and train, but it could be possible to have a trainer certificate for Norwood users. Norwood (or the user group, maybe?) could define the standards, the trainers could get the certificate, and then qualify for a 10% discount for supplies, as well as get referrals by people in their area that want to plunk down $50 for an hour training session.
How many users think $50 would be a fair price, for an introductory lesson?

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

Considering that $50 is the cost of 2 or 3 band saw blades, that sounds pretty reasonable. Main thing is to keep track of what you do and how well it works. Sounds like a dressing stone is a good investment. From what I've learned so far, you want the wheel to just "kiss" the blade, and it is best done in subdued light so you can see the sparks. Too heavy a grind will create a burr, and going too slow heats up the tip and takes the temper out. I've thought about using a coolant, but haven't tried that.

What about setting the blade? I understand that .022" offset is pretty standard. Most of the people I've talked to say to set the blade, then sharpen it. Any thoughts?

One thing that I have learned is to take more extra blades, in case I didn't get one sharpened right. Doesn't happen as often as it did at first.

Good judgement comes from experience... experience comes from bad judgement.

eddiemac
eddiemac's picture

The ideal set of a blade will vary depending on the hardness of the wood and the size of the logs you are cutting. Softer wood can take a larger set and the set should be increased as log size rises. I use .021" as it seems to work pretty good on the oak I usually cut. My sharpening must do more than kiss the blade because I always end up with a burr, though it always disappears after the first few trips through a log. I've set both before and after and can't tell the difference, though logic would say that before is best (if you don't take too much off the blade in sharpening). Some say they set every 3 or 4 sharpenings, but I wonder if they are cutting oak - I set every time. A blade that is somewhat dull will still cut straight if it is set correctly, but a sharp blade with inaccurate set won't cut well at all. Set is super important and is usually a factor when bands rise up or drop down in the cut.

Bill
Bill's picture

For me in dry or hard or hard dry wood I find 19 thou. set is plenty and I get the longest life out of my blades. This is 90% of what I cut and my theory is there is a lot lest strain on the blade with less set in hard woods. The last batch of blades I received from Norwood started cracking in the gullet right away and I'd never had this happen before.
When I checked the set I found they all had a 28 & 29 thou. set so that's what I contributed the cracks to sawing in dry hard wood.
Bill

eddiemac
eddiemac's picture

Brush the crud off (requires turning the band inside out twice if both sides are messy):

Set the teeth (turning required again):

Grinding:

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

Great pictures! Thanks.

Bill
Bill's picture

Here's a setter I may quite a few yrs. ago seems to work good ( actually the boards have not teeth marks nice and smooth)but I'd prefer a much faster system.


The next pic. is where I've had a lot of blades fail out of the last batch of gold premium blades.

Bill

Pages