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shaneh
shaneh's picture
Blades
Thinking of trying some 7* and 4* blades. Anybody know if I can use my Norwood sharpener/ setter without making any changes to them? \Thanks Shaneh
Bill
Bill's picture

Only thing I can think of is you would have to place the back roll pin to the highest hole and the front one to the lowest but then I don't know what angle that would be you'd have to check it with a protractor. As far as the setter goes it would make no difference. Or maybe just move 1 of the pins ?

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture
As far as I know, the Norwood sharpener is set for 10 degrees with no provision for 7 or 4, though it might be possible to modify it. The 7 or 4 would be useful for frozen wood.
Baron
Baron's picture
Due to illness and moving I've not milled in a year. However I had completely switch to 4's in the last couple years and the difference is appreciable. Hardwood is much easier to cut. I mention this because if you are into hardwoods.......especially frozen hardwoods .........7's and 4's make a noticeable and positive improvement. It would be worth figuring out how to modify your sharpener to accommodate these blades. I send my blades out as they come back to me sharper than new and they cut very true. Furthermore the average operator would likely not get their blades as clean before sharpening as my service gets them. Then he inscribes right onto the blade what he did to it and how many times it was sharpened so that the next time he'll know the history.
r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture
Illness? No, not you. Hope things are getting better in the new year. I've been cutting softwoods, but I do know that changing the angle on a chain makes a big difference for my chainsaw; what you say makes great sense. I use Woodmizer sharpening service, since they are so close, but your service sounds like a good premier service. I'd change if I had something like that available.
Baron
Baron's picture
Low level Illness Roland........I have a full-time job of selling flowrerbulbs from holland to lots of garden centers. Then on weekends I used to mill allot. Well somehow 61 years hit me and everything broke down.....all minor stuff that piles up and slows you down. Both knees, Si joint and L4-5, went bad but the Dr said I had to learn to live a while with it. Then my shoulder freaked out and Cortisone seems to have fixed it. Then I had serious jaw surgery in preparation for implants, gross. Had Rotor-Router on bladder and all that that entails and then a bone was removed in wrist. This past fall and still feeling it was Pneumonia. Lots of little minor stuff that has sort of knocked the wind out of my sails. I had to keep my real job as that pays the bills. There just wasn't any energy left for wood working and milling. Its all behind me now and I hope to go forward with wood again this year. Grumpy Grumpy Grumpy is how it was. Its being me now.
r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture
Man, getting old is catching up with you. So far, I've dodged some of the worst stuff, but my joints are reminding me of all the stuff I did when I was young and trying to show how tough I was. Hang in there, and keep making sawdust.
shaneh
shaneh's picture
Thanks for the replies guys. I think I will call Norwood to see if there is an easy fix and if not use a sharpening service for the 4* blades. I have too many 10*,S to use with the Norwood sharpener
Bill
Bill's picture
If you are cutting frozen or hard wood a 19 degree set works best.
DavidM
DavidM's picture
Hi Bill - I’m cutting live oak and pecan so I’m always looking for a better way to do things. I’ve always seen the set parameters in thousandths, how do I convert that do degrees? I would imagine that if it will cut frozen wood, a 19 degree set would probably cut live oak that’s been down for a few months.
eddiemac
eddiemac's picture
I'm pretty sure Bill means .019". The hook angle, though, is in degrees.
Baron
Baron's picture
Dave I have cut a good deal of dry maple and ash and after wasting my time on 10 degree blades and the bad cuts it produces I switched to 7 and then 4 degree. Will never look back on that one. I believe it will do well in Live oak as it works well for me in Chestnut oak (similar). I'd be happy to send anyone my blade and sharpening service info. In all other areas I ride for the brand. Blades are my only exception. Just What do you mean Bill? Ya got some kinda secrets up there in the outback of Armstrongville?
Bill
Bill's picture
I actually meant set to much cracks the blade in the gullet 19 to 21 thou set I found best. More is fine in soft or green wood.
Baron
Baron's picture

I wish I had Green Doug Fir. I've built a drift boat and was forced to use Western Red Cedar for the trimmings. .

Bill
Bill's picture
I've only used 10 degree hook angle because that's what the sharpener does but if I had a pile of hard dry wood I'd try a 7 degree hook on one, I'm not really into having a bunch of different blades to mess with and just adjust the feed speed accordingly so far.
Bill
Bill's picture
BTW Baron it's good to hear your doing better nice to get over it while your still young.Last Feb. I got poly mialgia sure slowed me down for a while :o( .
DavidM
DavidM's picture
Thanks for the advice all. Guess I need to just break down and try some 7 degree blades - I’ve toyed with the idea but sharpener is all set up for 10 degrees so I keep putting it off. I’ve also thought about cobalt blades and I saw some carbide tipped blades advertised but don’t want to tear up my band wheels if there’s a problem. Bottom line is I just keep procrastinating lol. I’ve cut quite a bit of big live oak in the 34”/36” lately and it sure is hard on blades so I need to go ahead and do it.
Baron
Baron's picture
Dave you'll want 4 degree for sure on that. let the water roar. When cutting slabs that wide tension up a little after the first cut as the heat of those big cuts expands your blade a hair. you'll get nice flat cuts.
Baron
Baron's picture
Ouch Bill. That is a handful to get through. Cold weather doesn't help. Glad ya made it through. I think some of these members are actually getting younger.
r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture
Yeah, Bill. Keep healthy! Us old farts need to keep sawing!
Baron
Baron's picture
Hey now Roland.........:-)
Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture
Baron, glad to hear you're on the mend! I recently leaned the meaning of "bust a gut" and now have a polymer mesh-reinforced abdomen. Looking forward to working with you at the ShootOut this Oct. It shouldn't be too hard to modify the Norwood sharpener for 4 & 7 degree hook, but the profile of the gullet is a whole 'nother critter. Every manufacturer seems to have their own profile that they think works best. You might find a deeper gullet better for removing sawdust from wide slabs and making aggressive cuts in softwood, while a shallow gullet makes for a stiffer blade. Depending on the blade, the Norwood sharpener may cut a deeper gullet, or may just take a bit off the tip and not even touch the bottom of the gullet (which is OK-- you're only interested in the tip).
Baron
Baron's picture
Hey Postie! I second your comments regarding the shootout. Although I don't sharpen my own blades I have long wished there were cleaners (rakers) spaced into the teeth like chainsaws and two-man saws often have. I'd like to use more lube at all times, not just when cutting the wide slabs, but there is a fine line btwn having the right amount of lube and making a mucky mess with too much lube. A cleaner cut would help greatly in allowing more lube but with less schmuck slopping off everywhere. I wonder if there is any research showing whether any of the blade manufacturers have experimented with rakers? As usual I may be overthinking this subject but there you have it........the subject for your next article:-)
Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture
Hmmm... interesting idea. The rakers control the depth of cut for each tooth. This is more easily controlled by the feed rate on a sawmill than freehand cutting with a chain saw. I've been playing with the idea of a skip tooth blade for wide slabs for better chip removal.
Baron
Baron's picture
In addition to controlling depth the Rakers on a Two-man-saw also drags chips out to the sides. So to try your experiment you could remove the set on certain teeth and the pattern may resemble this: tooth set left, tooth straight, tooth set right, tooth straight and so on. Or you might align them as follows: left, right, straight, straight, left, right, straight, straight......and so on. In these scenarios you may find yourself cutting slower but with much less frass in the cut. The teeth that are not set would be filed straight across (no bevel) and might be tipped off 1/32" or less. This may work well and...... We're all willing to let you do the hard work.
Bill
Bill's picture
A band saw mainly only clears the sawdust from the gullet I'm not so sure how you'd' be able to get rid of the saw dust that gathers in the space created by the set in the blade to reduce friction.
Baron
Baron's picture
You may be right but I bet a skip tooth as described above would do allot of cleaning. Maybe we should take bets on Post Oak, try to make some money on it.
Bill
Bill's picture
I think a skip tooth would work great on large pine or spruce logs ( even small ) but I'd have to try one on hard or dry wood to make a decision. There must be a reason we don't see them advertised like the smaller shop band saw blades.
Baron
Baron's picture
Well I wouldn't be surprised if your correct but it was fun to think about briefly. You're the voice of reason from the northern reaches.
r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture
Aww, reason is not as much fun as adventure. I'll take the Red Green avenue!
kirk
kirk's picture
Good afternoon gentlemen i have an lm 29 sawmill have issues with roller guides, the roller on the drive side always spinning the one on the idler side on and off. watch a few vidieos on norwoods site they say you can adjust height mine are fixed can only adjust in or out.also put new belts on.

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