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eddiemac
eddiemac's picture
Try switching them. They wear unevenly.
kirk
kirk's picture
i did not much different.i took both of them off and put tension on the blade as if i was going to mill, then i put the rollers in set them all the way back and it looks like the band wheels are not even arcoss drive side seems 3/16 higher any suggestions.
Bill
Bill's picture
Roller is 3/16th higher ?
kirk
kirk's picture
No lower
Baron
Baron's picture
On my 36 they don't always spin as they just touch the blade but barely. As I understand they don't need to touch in order to do the job.
r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture
I also have an LM29. The roller isn't really height adjustable;I guess you could shim the mount a little where it attaches to the deck, but that shouldn't be necessary. When you have the blade adjusted and tensioned, does it touch both rollers? Even with minor tension, if it is not sagging between the wheels, it should rest on the rollers, at least touching.
kirk
kirk's picture
yes it does but touches first on the drive side, then on oppsite side where you can adjust the roller in or out. I usally put tension untill both touch then put 4 to 5 turns on the tensioner. do you guys know how to put picture on this site i can try to up load some pictures. also i am cutting so hard spruce trees that have a lot of knots getting a lot of blade walking up and down i am using saber tooth blades for from norwood 10 degree 7/8 pitch.
r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture
I tighten my blade as far as I can turn it, then back off about 1/4 to 1/2 turn. Too loose of a blade will cause the wandering. Is the back of your blade guide pushing against the blade? I have about 3/16" from the blade to the rim of the guide; that way, it isn't getting pushed by the guide, but it will keep it from getting pushed back off the wheels. If your guide is pushing the back of the blade, it can increase the wandering. I go by engine sound. When the engine starts bogging down, I push slower. Are you getting full RPM on your engine? I remember that I had to deviate a little from the instructions, or I was only getting about 75% power. I have the throttle cable held a little further from the engine than the instructions said.
Baron
Baron's picture

Kirk, I've been away from this for a few months and don't know how to post either but all these fellas are glad because I no longer drag their computers down with photos of everything. I had an issue when I first started using the rollers and that is I wasn't tensioning enough and was constantly hitting the back guide. My Sharpening guy brought it to my attention. He always checks customers blades with a micrometer and he found that allot of my really dull blades were mushroomed and a couple were just plain ruined. I was always pushing too hard, once a blade really needed changing, and it they were being rounded over at the back. So I found that trying to get that one last cut out of a blade was actually costing me a blade. Once I added tension and backed off that roller a bit my blades lasted longer. When cutting spruce I tension even further. It rises less but I break more blades.

kirk
kirk's picture
Thank you i am going to try putting more tension on the way you do garrison. you have the lm29 does your roller on the drive side spinnig when tensioned up not cutting? mine does when throttled up not cutting the other roller barley spins.iam also going to try setting back the guides a litte further back i followed norwood spec.1/8 of an inch. Have you guys ever replace rollers? Baron what do you use for blades on spruce?
Baron
Baron's picture
Any blade works well for spruce but ironically I usually use 4 degree blades. The key is to tension up and go slow. Do you know how to whistle? Learn. then slow down more. Try whistling the theme from Mayberry RFD and slow down more. Slow down and become attentive. Spruce is now on of my favorite live edge stuff now. If you are cutting Spruce and you approach a knot watch the blade kerf, if you see it wavering, back up and approach it again and again until it goes straight. I got to the point where I could tell when a blade was going to rise up on a knot and by stopping, and going back and forth a few times until it cuts flat, I've made nice lumber. Spruce would cut fast if it were always clear but the the minute you go fast you'll hit a knot that you failed to detect so I just automatically go very slow on spruce. Its even worse for me because I only cut urban sourced logs that had their limbs all the way to the ground.....knots all the way. I have similar issues with dead Ash but I poor on the lube and go slow. watch the feed......let it clear the shute without clumping. Your blades will last longer and you won't be mushrooming them on the back roller.
kirk
kirk's picture
Well thank you for the input going out side soon as it get to 20 degrees this morning and start milling. I would like to try the 4 degree blades but my woodland sharpener does 7-10-14 degree and nobody around here sharpens big band saw blades in the northeast here.
Baron
Baron's picture
I live in PA and while I could sharpen myself I don't. You may not know it but your time is worth too much, way too much. I send it to a man whom does it all for $8 each, 10-15 blades at a time. He cleans them much better than I can, Indexes their condition with an engraver right onto the blade, He SETS them every time and when they're returned they cut better than new. His blades are the same company that makes the Sabre blades for Norwood I believe.
Bill
Bill's picture
No need to go less than 7 degree for what your cutting . Slow down an " or 2 from the knot where the grain goes either up or down then you can speed up once you get to the knot this will help from the blade wanting to fallow the grain.
Baron
Baron's picture
I generally agree with your statement Bill, because I have compared both 7 and 4. However If you're cutting Norway Maple, Sugar Maple crotches, Beech or Dead(dry) Ash you'll benefit greatly with the 4 degree. Those are the only exceptions I've found and since I can only justify one I use 4 degree. The difference is noticeable. Living here in the Northeast I cut allot of those varieties. I only have 30-45 blades on hand and so I buy only 4's. If I keep up sawing I'll eventually have 10s and 4s or 7s and 4s. For now I'm still building up the 4s. I tried .045 and it seemed to slow down and I went back to .042. Bill did you ever get snow this year. In PA we.ve had almost none.
Bill
Bill's picture

Ba

ron 140% above average :o) snow fall.

All the pics. are on my phone but this one I tried to get of an elk which I'd never seen around here before , they wandered all over the property for a few days in deep snow looking for something to eat.

Bill
Bill's picture

Here's a couple pics. 

Clicked on upload

new text rich area opened clicked on last box at bottom Media browser

selected pics from camera 

clicked submit

choose original from box  then clicked up load

a lot of hoops to go threw :o) 

Then submit post ast bottom of page

Bill
Bill's picture

After clicking nedia browser , choose from library comes up

Bill
Bill's picture

Wife and I camping 50 or 60 miles N. of here where there use to be large cedars some far bigger than this but not many left .

Bill
Bill's picture

Sorry I'm not great at explaining but any one wishing to post pics.and having trouble respond soon with the question before I forget how I did this. BTW I also repair printers for the garbage :o)

nothing to do with milling but hoping to create some smiles.

kirk
kirk's picture
nice pictures bill. i tighten up on tension like you said and slowed down much better, when milling spruce you guys use 7/8 pitch or 3/4 pitch
Baron
Baron's picture
Not sure Kirk. I assume 7/8. Glad to be of some help. Bill, Nice to see your dinner walking around before its cooked. Those deer look yummy. I assume thats your sweetie. My Wife and I loved walking through the redwood stumps in Eureka and I've seen really big Fir on the coast. When at the tree service I topped one fir at 225' when I was 21. It was probably 250 or 260'. The biggest cedar I've seen is incense cedar in the CA Sierra, Maybe 225 - 250 and 8- 9 ' dia. at head height. I've ofter wondered if Western Red Cedar and Sitka get that tall and thick. The one in your photo is big and the springboard notches are 8' or more up.
wayne busse
wayne busse's picture

see if this worked. this is a desk out of white pine slabs that I glued up. I milled the log 18 months ago for a customer who then brought the slabs back to me and I put them back on the mill and ripped them in half and added a center section to get a 30" table top and legs.

wayne busse
wayne busse's picture
Walnut coffee table for sale at the craft show

Bill
Bill's picture
Very Nice Wayne !!!!
Baron
Baron's picture
I like Walnut!
r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture
This site needs a 'Wow, beautiful' button. Great work, Wayne!
eddiemac
eddiemac's picture
Very fine, Wayne! Glad to see some folks got the pics figured out.

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