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Sandshandymanservice
Sandshandymanservice's picture
LOG BED BOW (SWALE)

NOT A FIRST TIME PROBLEM HERE: Howdy all, so I'm a Norwood HD36 owner and sorta proud of it to. I like the saw, take care of it and respect it. My favorite thing to do when I'm not with the wife. Make all sorts of lumber, have all sorts of species of logs and like doing so. But my deck gets a bow or swale in it. Some say it's from putting heavy logs on it, do you think? Whatever.....that it develops and keeps me from cutting true is a major issue. My friend in Tech support told me all about loosing all the assembly hardware from the middle out about 8 feet on both sides of middle, jacking it straight and re-tightening everything. That worked. Two months later it's back......ERRRRRRRRRRRRRR. It sits on concrete, I know how to use a level and a string if need be. No the tires are not on it. It's solid, it's to design specs with bunks and support in the proper spots. I've even put small chains and a binder on the middle two support jacks to keep them from spreading apart from heavy logs. You know that sales picture of the log bed without the saw head pilled up with logs to show how much weight the bed can handle looks great.....but did it get a bow or swale in it???? I need a permanent fix here pals....don't like having this problem. Any smarties out there, do the HD36 engineers know this is a problem???

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Bill
Bill's picture
Is it just sagging down or is it getting out of line as well, if so you'll have to anchor the legs to the concrete.
eddiemac
eddiemac's picture
Do what several of us have done (there's a thread about it somewhere on the forum). Bolt a length of all-thread from side to side at the various points where it bows out. On my LM2000, it was at a low point under the bunks. Found it: https://www.norwoodsawmills.com/forum/norwood-sawmills-equipment-forum/c...
Sandshandymanservice
Sandshandymanservice's picture
Thanks Bill and Eddiemac.....yes frustration is the word. But hark.....I read the previous posting in its entirety...threaded rod looks like it could be the fix, and none intrusive allowing mill get up and go if needed elsewhere. One of the new Tech gals suggested lock tyte on the assembly bolts....uppssseee. Ya know the chains and binders I have holding the two middle sets of legs together to avoid splay, thought theyd have taken care of the problem but guess not, bed must still twist.

SVinmans

Bill
Bill's picture
You could just buy some flat iron drill it and bolt it to the bottom of the rails under each bunk that wouldn't interfere with moving the mill.
r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture
I have an LM29, which is a bit lighter than the HD36, and I feel your pain; I've done the same thing. I really haven't had any really big logs on my mill (any old-timers can jump in here); the heaviest was only a gum log at about 5500 pounds. I have mine on a trailer, which complicates things. I have a handful of those little jack stands they have for levelling trailers (about $20.00 or so for a set of two) and I use those in between the other supports. Now, I need to go outside and straighten out the log stops I bent, then the winch post (which I also bent, trying to turn that monster gum log). Note: to use the winch to load the gum log on the mill, I had to use a cable pulley attached to a tree behind the mill; the log kept trying to pull the mill over, instead of playing nice.
hayseedfx
hayseedfx's picture

you did not mention how heavy the logs you put on were or how much bow there was, but odds are it's more than the weight causing the issue.... i quite often put 5 tons or more on my mill but it is not on legs.... it stays true....

once i dropped a very large stump on the end that did some damage.... that was my fault....

every few years i'll take my entire mill apart and reassemble the bed.... the bolts will loosen up over time.... some will be even missing.... i put a stainless steel wire pulled extremely tight down each side to align true....

long log decks are susceptible to racking when manually loading large logs, especially if the logs are less than smooth... irregular shaped logs or the occasional knot can force a single bunk to carry more than it's fair share of the weight....

my mill is on 6 inches of concrete and bolted to treated 6x6's which they themselves are anchored down.... this help avoid most racking and bowing..... that will solve the problem.....h

//---- video explaining the wire on long decks....

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZwdK8EF60O4

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture
My mill, being mobile, is often on softer ground. I sometimes use the Norwood calculator to get an estimate of the logs, and a number of them exceed 4000 pounds, some exceed 5000. Here's a cedar log from a couple years ago: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B9hiGcsIM8WPdkpTbmk1d19lT0E/view?usp=sh... And a gum log from this year. The gum log was actually heavier: https://drive.google.com/file/d/13cWHpuFLrNLZ5eOvb0SqxueF6y623Bww/view?u...
hayseedfx
hayseedfx's picture

hey garrison.... bet that big ole gum took a while to chew thru....

i try to stay under 4000 because it's manual... the mill has almost 31 feet of cuttable deck so some logs will be very heavy because of length, not girth... it's a mx34....

have often considered buying a mobile mill someday.... kinda like 'have gun will travel'.....h

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture
Yeah, the gum took a bit of work. Bent my stops and the winch post while turning it. Had to anchor the sawmill to a tree with a cable to get it on the mill' the mill would move instead of the log if I didn't.
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