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kirk
kirk's picture
milling red cedar logs
Anybody out there mill red cedar and have issues, i was cutting 1 inch boards and then board would start to bow. The log was tapered i leveled the log for the first cut and then rolled it 180 degrees and started making boards. Is there a special way to make boards with a tapered log.
r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture
I have a bit of practice cutting cedar, and I found it tends to sag a bit. I built an extra couple bunks, so the ends were supported. That may be part of your issue. Cedar is used for shakes and shingles because it likes to split down the grain; when I am cutting it, I make certain the center of the log is the same height from the bed on both ends. I have a 2" diameter bar I lay on each end, across the rails, and measure up from in. If one end is more than 1/2" or so from the other end, I set a shim under the log, make a cut, then put that side down (so the grain runs parallel to the bed).
eddiemac
eddiemac's picture
On red cedar I always try to get the pith (heart) centered at both ends (on the first cut and the next 180 degree cut). Even so, the boards will sometimes crook (side-to-side bend). And you can't always go by the pith as sometimes it wanders to the edge on one end, especially with long logs. Don't you just love those wood wasting tapers?
Bill
Bill's picture
Just sawed a no. of cedar logs like mentioned I center them but never had much problem with tension in the only a couple bowed a bit.
kirk
kirk's picture
So you guys level the log take a first cut thru the and then rotate 180* degrees and then start cut one inch boards?
r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture
Level the log, take a first cut, making slabs or whatever down to a good edge (the definition of good edge changes depending on what boards I want), then turn, level the log, and cut to another good edge; usually making a corner with the two, just for simplicity. Then I turn, no more need to level, cut to a cant the thickness of the board width I want (or a kerf width over twice the width), turn one more time, and cut boards. Then I go back and put some of the previous stuff I cut on the mill, sometimes 4 or 6 boards wide, edging.
kirk
kirk's picture
thanks garrison i will give that a try
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