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Baron
Baron's picture

Blair, wow, you covered all the bases. Your brother-in-law is a smart cookie and I hope he figures it out someday. I have a solar kiln and just because the heat is free doesnt mean its free to use that heat. Its a pretty time consuming process. 

I also wondered if sawdust couldn't be used in this gasification stuff some of you have been talking about.

smithbr
smithbr's picture

Don

No, he did; we just talked it through over a beer, then he ran with it.  But he's back working for the company that laid him off, making much more now than he did then (he's got the job of the guy who laid him off 8-)), and jetting all over the continent, so I doubt he's going further with it before he retires.  He was looking into it partially because he was trying to get a business going importing a pellet burning European gassification home furnace, and supplying the pellets as well would have been a natural outgrowth; and partially because he saw the wastes piling up in my backyard from a logging operation and the beginnings of our sawing, and saw a need, especially since one of the major employment niches in the area is deforestation forest management.  But the import process bogged down, and he got himself re-employed, so he dropped it.

Burning sawdust is actually difficult when wet, as it's almost self-smothering.  I can toss a shovel full of dry sawdust into the outdoor furnace now and then if I want to, and could probably even burn all that I produce as an occasional sawyer, but not if I was cutting daily.  It would be better compressed, I'm sure, but unless I can do that easily, and unless demand dried up for my raw sawdust, I don't see the point for me.  With about 14 acres of woodlot, I'm not able to keep up with the deadfalls and windblown trees for firewood, selecting the best logs for the mill along the way; I leave the branch tops for the bugs and critters. 

My friend with the hayburners needs the dust more than I do.  I bag it, and take a load of bags with me when I'm in her neighborhood (near our summer cottage), so the cost is the time to bag it, really, and I have to do something with it anyway.  She gives me her empty feed bags, gets them back full of sawdust.  Every bag of sawdust saves her the cost of a large bale of shavings from the local mill (sawdust seems to absorb a lot more before getting soggy, she says), so she's happy as a clam - though with six horses, she'd take at least 3x as much as I produce now.  Some of her horse manure goes into our garden, because it helps lighten up the clay soil, which turns to cement in the summer sun otherwise.  I should check the ph of the soil, though, I guess.

 

Blair

 

Baron
Baron's picture

It is a complex situation but Roland is on it. 

There are other chemicals in Wood that make sawdust a poor choice as a soil ammendment. It actually, minus the horse manure, makes a modest pre-emmergent herbicide. Soil testing would be wise as it would be easy to over do it with continuing applications.

I don't have an environmentalists bone in my body but I find it embarrassing how we waste our natural resourses. just visit the dumpster in your local housing development for an example of how much "good stuff" we throw out. 

I had heard that corn starch, parafins, and other natural substances have been employed as a caking agent (AKA glue), for sawdust logs. I'd heard that the act of applying high pressure while packing into a log creates heat and that the above substances become a bonding agents. I'm happy to let others try it. 

 

 

smithbr
smithbr's picture

I know, howabout sawdust Cheerios?  Or Honeycomb?  Might not be able to tell the difference from the commercial product, but provides a lot more surface area, so should burn!bvwink

(back to work)

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

... or maybe a high fiber drink (Tang)?  The best soil ammendment would be "biochar" which is basically charcoal.  It is possible to make charcoal from the sawdust & slabs, but again, you need to start with dry material.  I've thought about chunk charcoal for barbecues, as well.  Will have to get some other projects out of the way first, though.  Ultimately, it would be cool to run the sawmill on wood gas.  Lots of info on the internet.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iqHDB17Kjbw

Baron
Baron's picture

That is pretty cool

OL' Purple Pete
OL' Purple Pete's picture

I'm going to try to make a Cam Lock for my little LM2000.I looked at the new frontier sawmill.And look close enough you see peices copied from the new hd36 another mill to make cheaper mill.I have to wait till the 10 or 15th of may for the snow to leave.And hopefully for the ground to dry out,Mud from the deepest part of,Well you know lol.When id perfect it I'll leave a note here .And I just seen someone make a a raise and lower head works for their mill.And now that made tinker start to draw one for my little LM2000.To bad Nowoods don't have there own photo site to put photos for us all to see.Well if GOD is willing and the ground dries out I'll make a CamLock for the LM2000,I'll be doing it on rainy days.

OL' Purple Pete
OL' Purple Pete's picture

laugh I'm laughing at my cam dog I made.I'm at stage 2 out of stage 4.

                                                                                                           enlightened  Stage 1 = first sat there on stool in the basement while it was raining out,I drew up a plan on cam dog on paper and then tried it on cardboard lol.

                                                                              Stage 2= I made a wooden (fred flinstone) working model.Now that worked in theory laugh .Now HEAVEN forbid lol on the next stage.blush That will be made with metal lol lmao not with wood,screws and nails.

                                                                A few days before I get to this stage 3. 

                                        Stage 3 = made with metal and will be testing it out lol, chuckle, fingers crossed and alot of prayers.

 Stage 4 = then paint it. 

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

While I continue to find a good binder for the sawdust, I'll throw in another vote for making small clamps on the fly.

I've found that I can grab a small steel bar (about 3" long X 1" wide), give it a bit of a bend in the middle (so one end is off the bunk); that and a vice grip makes a good low-level clamp.

If it is wider than the bunk. I can clamp it, then pound the back side with a hammer to grip in the log better.

It's getting so I don't use the store-bought clamp when I'm cutting against the stops at the lowest position; the home made ones are so easy.

OL' Purple Pete
OL' Purple Pete's picture

I seen this on the forestry forum,.I asked for some ideas on how to DIY log dogs for bandmill.Well some guy built them EXTRA Heavy duty.So with a little small thought I copied and crossed breed the OS27 band mill & LM2000 to make mine.Still got to get materail and drill press and mig welder home to complete the job.Not really that hard once you think about how to do it.I drew it out on paper and then proceeded to make one out of wood and Nails , wood screws, some pieces of plywood also.And a rubber band to return the point,acting like a spring to return the tip back from the log.I'll put on the norwoods forum on facebook.I found it easier to do so.For me to post a photo here FORGET IT,LOST CAUSE FOR ME,NOT PUTER SAVY.

 

 

 

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

Sounds interesting.  I'll look for it on Facebook.  They've made adding photos a lot easier.  Just click on the photo icon (far right-- I think it is supposed to look like a picture of mountains) above the text entry area, then select the file you want to add.

logbuilder
logbuilder's picture

Here is a few of my mods built so far.

Blade Guide Rollers

Grapple Hook

Sliding Dog Bar

Rolling Toe Boards

Tree Pusher.

and one still in progress with this manuel feed, all that is left to do is hooking up the feed line through the pulleys to the enchoring point.

 

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

Logbuilder, sawmill mods looking good!  Now, if you could just do something about that snow.  Getting cold just looking at your pictures!

logbuilder
logbuilder's picture

Postie I was going to say you wouldn' beleive how much is still on the groound but you can see in the that sawmill is portable and cover in snow and I took this pic yesterday. Be glad when mother Naturte turns that white stuff green.

Bill

Oldpath05
Oldpath05's picture

Couple weeks ago my 6 year old log deck gave out when my son tried to saw a couple big pines, It was made of tripled up 2"x8" which my son said made it rot quicker. So he ripped it all apart and trashed the rest, then he cut down a Oak  and made the top runners of one piece 6"x 8"x 13', the rest 2 by hemlock, then painted with red-neck deck stain.....

 

 

 

Now with new log deck my son  says he's tied of turning big logs with cant hook, ok with 2 people but most times I'm not around, and log turning threads here with some ingenius way of doing that or should I price a log turnner from Norwood for my MX 34 mill? And whyyyy hasn't Norwood fixed spell check yet? no wonder why I'm mostly on TBN......And what's with this verifacation thing before sumitting a post and editing, that absulutly unnessary and agravating......

Bill
Bill's picture

Nice deck Oldpath it isn't going anyware any time soon. 

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

I have a Norwood winch, but before that, I playes with some pretty good size logs. I used a hook on the end of a come-along, which I attached to the mobile frame . That worked pretty well for rolling logs, if I had my stops up. Not as fast as the winch, but let me roll some big logs safely.

Note: I also have a short bit of pipe I stick into one of the leg posts, so I have a 2' long post in case the log tries to roll off the other side. I am too lazy to roll the log back on the sawmill a second time.

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

Norwood's log dog assist makes turning logs a lot easier, since it keeps them from rolling back when you turn them.  I've got one and it works great.  Norwood's log turner works all right.  I adapted a 12V winch & deep cycle battery to mine to save cranking, and that was a big improvement.  A couple of notes about it... you have to remove the post from the receiver when you mill,  It also involves bolting a cross piece under the frame to reinforce it, which may interfere with clamps.  If you have strong enough rafters, you might want to mount a hoist and turn logs with that.

 

Nice looking sawmill shed & log deck!

jmartin61
jmartin61's picture

Do you have any pics you can post?

Thanks

Jay

countryboymike
countryboymike's picture

Once you use the hyd log turner its a LOT easier on old bones and production time is much better.  Leaves more time to go to the shop and sit in the chair (with rollers)  smiley

countryboymike
countryboymike's picture

Once you use the hyd log turner its a LOT easier on old bones and production time is much better.  Leaves more time to go to the shop and sit in the chair (with rollers)  smiley

Traditional-Too...
Traditional-Toolworks's picture

Having problems add pics here, but let me explain this and put a link to a drawing I just made up.

 

This is to create a manual log turning device that would be used for sawyers like me who saw alone. As many of you realize, moving and manipulating the log is one of the most difficult tasks for a sawyer who saws by themselves.

 

Short of adding hydraulics, it seems having a device to assist in turning the logs could be a huge plus for me. In the past there was a guy who created a device using sprockets and roller chain, the company was called swing-set and made bunks for swing mills like the Lucas or similar. It seems he has since gone out of business. I was planning to make something simliar myself, and actually have a 20' length of #80 chain I was going to use, but a light popped on in my head and I realized there's a cheaper way to do this. The chain can be found cheap on ebay, but the sprockets are like $30 each.

 

So, this idea comes from some machine skates I made, it uses ball bearings to suppor the weight. Here's a link to a photo gallery on my website. These support my 4000 lb. lathe nicely.

Adding a pic test:

[img=http://www.traditionaltoolworks.com/mw/mini-pivot-skates/mini-pivot-skat...http://www.traditionaltoolworks.com/mw/mini-pivot-skates/mini-pivot-skates-together.jpg[/img]

What I am planning to do is create a steel arch (tube/pipe,plate,whatever) to hold ball bearings so that a log can be lifted and turned easily on the bearings. This will allow for someone to easily lift and turn the logs. This would be attached to a floor jack, I bought a couple used ones on craigslist to use. I may need bigger ones, but this is to prove the concept. I would use one of these on each end of the log, turn it how I want with a cant hook and lower back on the bed. Toe boards are something I don't have and would like interchangable tops for the floor jacks so I can change to toe boards or just have a separate set. Could also mount a bottle jack to the bed and use it for the toe boards.

Adding a pic test:

 

What do you guys think?

 

EDIT: I just figured out yet another problem putting youtube links in messages, if you use the BBCode it converts the code to a non-secure (http) for the youtube video and it's actually an https: in this case. Same problem as img but this time converting to non-secure and it's really a secure. surprise Should always use the URI given to you by the user...IMO...

 

Alan

Bill
Bill's picture

Do you think roller skate wheels would work ?

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

I like the idea. Some thoughts:

If you can find parts from an old camp trailer, a scissors jack they use to stabilize those should work.

You probably don't need a lot of bearings; maybe find some wheels from heavy equipment instead of bearings? Maybe someone is parting out an old tool cabinet.

Depending on availability in local areas...

Traditional-Too...
Traditional-Toolworks's picture

Bill yes I think skateboard wheels could work if you had a hard time finding bearings. I have used ball bearings in the past and they work well. Skateboard wheels are pretty similar to a ball bearing, but they're not sealed normally, I don't think.

r.garrison1 funny you mention the scissor jack, I bought 2 RV scissor jacks for this very purpose, but the problem was in raising them with a load on them. I tried using one on the front end of my '46 Chevy pickup and it was hard to turn the handle and I'm not sure a cordless drill has enough power. That was my plan, use a cordless drill to raise/lower it. Those would be good for an unstable sawmill trailer bed though.

 

I think the floor jack would work ok, short of actual hydraulics.

 

I'm gonna try this ball bearing idea, and will let you guys know how it comes out when I do. Might take a couple weeks to get to, not sure.

 

Alan

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

I've been thinking about the log roller, and one thing came to mind. If the log is pretty uniform in shape, it should work well. If the log is uneven, it may be a problem if the rollers are too small.

Maybe have the whole curve roll in a slot on a pin or two, with rollers mounted on the pins?

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