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fmac
fmac's picture
Cutting on percentage
I have had a request buy a customer to cut some lumber on percentage. I have not done this before and would like some opinions on what percentage would be fair. My mill is stationary and he will deliver the logs to me so my only labor and cost would be cutting. What’s everyone’s opinion? Fmac
Bill
Bill's picture
If you need the wood ( and there nice logs )might be OK my experience has been negative the 3 times I've done it.Either dirty logs, crooked or small some short then they wanted far more than half so I've decided by the hr or nothing. A beautiful black walnut log would change my attitude. I know there are others that don't mind 60 / 40 or 50 /50 .
fmac
fmac's picture
This is neighbor who is a cabinet maker. At the moment I have all my blades at the sharpener . This gives me time to go look at what he wants cut and can better make a decision. Thanks fmac Fmac
eddiemac
eddiemac's picture
I've had some good experiences cutting on shares. It's best to evaluate the logs (and the customer) ahead of time to know what to expect and if the project will be worthwhile. Make sure he understands your method of dividing the lumber. I do 50/50 (sorting by grade), though would not be adverse to taking less for valuable or unusual lumber.
r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

I like doing it. I usually do 60/40 for a wood I want, if it's a single log. If it is quite a bit, I may go 50/50. If it isn't something I really want to add to my collection, I suggest 70/30 or something like that.

Baron
Baron's picture
Who get's the bark? Ive always thought that a fair way would be to have picks: I pick, you pick, I pick, u Pick and so on. That is how we settled Mom and Dads personal estate and that allows everyone to get some of the cool stuff and be stuck with some of the bad stuff and both parties would feel like they had an equal affect on the outcome.
eddiemac
eddiemac's picture
That's the way I do it, though I sort them into grades first so we don't have to look through the whole pile every time. Unfortunately, the sawyer gets the trash unless the customer wants some slabs or firewood or sawdust.
r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture
I sort it into stacks with two grades; good wood, and some defects. I have basically two stacks of each, equal size, and the offset (the difference in the wood I get) off to the side. I then let the customer pick which stack he wants. If he prefers slabs, I may have one stack slab heavy, but I try to be fair to him and myself.
Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture
If there are enough logs, I split up the lot by logs. Flip a coin to see who gets first choice, then the second person picks two logs, then alternate. That way, a smaller log with better quality might be an early pick, you have the consistency of boards coming from the same log, and you each get logs cut the way you want 'em. If a log turns out to be hollow, you can either try to make it even or just call it the luck of the draw-- as long as you agree in advance. Also, you can mill the customer's logs, send him on his way, and saw your lot at your convenience.
eddiemac
eddiemac's picture
Have done it that way too, and prefer it. However, it puts the customer at a disadvantage if he doesn't know how to judge logs.
fmac
fmac's picture
Went and looked at what my cabinetmaker had. He has a wild cherry 20 inches at the trunk and 9 feet till it branches . It branches off with two large limbs each about 14 inches across and each will make some good lumber. this one is going to be a challenge. Will keep you posted. May try to get some pictures. Fmac😁
Bill
Bill's picture
The butt log should be great but when it comes to the limbs allow plenty for twisting or warping btw this has been my experience with limbs but others may have had different experiences.
r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture
I second Bill's comment. Any wood that isn't growing vertical has strange stress on it when you cut it. Fruitwood is some of the worst for changing, from the wood I have cut.
DavidM
DavidM's picture
I like Post Oakies method of dividing the logs but have only been able to do it that way a couple of times. My experience with cutting on shares has been that if I take the time to communicate with the customer and find out what they are wanting and coming to an understanding of what we’re going to do it usually is a good experience. Some folks are just not going to be happy no matter how hard I try so I have invited them to let someone else cut their logs for them or if I am already in the mess give them what they want and don’t deal with them again. I’ve had mostly good experiences - I become more generous if it’s something I really want lol. Like Bill I’ve had bad results cutting branches or even trunks that lean more than 45 degrees - boards warp even if I strap them. I’m at the point that I won’t wear a blade on branches.
fmac
fmac's picture
I don,t saw much for others. I am afraid I would get just that, limbs and trash.so am selective. I make small boxes and some dulcimer,s and old time mountain banjo,s and need thin boards and I made a small platform I can put on the mill to cut very short rounds . I just hate to see firewood rounds with very good potential be burned. it is amazing what you can find in some people’s firewood stack. Been too wet here to saw ,so am waiting for a dry spell to cut the cherry. It has a very good potential of yielding some very good crouch grain boards. I can see another dulcimer or banjo now. later. Fmac😁 .
DavidM
DavidM's picture
That’s so awesome turning firewood into instruments! I would love to see some of your work.
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