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r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

Here's a plant stand I made for a friend. I rubbed Yellow Ochre into the cedar across the back, Burnt Sienna across the front, and then poured linseed oil/turpentine across it and rubbed it all together. I topped it with lacquer, then rubbed beeswax/mineral oil into it (a paste I made similar to butcher block conditioner).

eddiemac
eddiemac's picture

Beautiful top, and you've done wonders with the color, and finish.

Bill
Bill's picture

That's beautiful , love the finish !!!!

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

It's actually pretty simple to do, with the oil color being so cheaply available. I don't use the high-end colors, the basic ones do great. Since they are linseed-oil based, they readilly spread with hardware-store linseed oil. Only caution is that linseed oil can spontaneously combust if you store the rags or brushes in a closed space; I set mine in the forge, on the anvil, until they have aired out a bit. If they start burning there, only metal is around.

For this one, I just squirted a little ribbon about 1/2 inch long of each color on the raw wood, then rubbed in each color with a corner of a shop towel. Poured on the clear oil, and rubbed each color in with the oil, then one used the other half of the shop towel to blend it together.

Putting them in a burn barrel will work too.

 

You can get all kinds of special colors; how the wood takes the color varies, so play with it a bit. For cedar, green, white, light yellow, and purples don't seem to look very good; on locust, I've used light yellow, green, and purple with good success.

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

Finishing is a lot of work, but in your case, it really paid off.  Nice work!

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

Decided to try the same process on a table I made for the deck today. I only sanded to 80 grit, so I don't expect a perfect finish.

First, smear some yellow ochre and some burnt sienna onto the tabletop:

Then after you brush it in undiluted, you spill some linseed oil/turpentine onto it, and smear it around a bit more. At this point, I am still keeping the colors separated:

Next, spill some more linseed oil mix onto the top, and brush everything together. Stop when you think you have the right tones, or get tired:

Then, take a break for 5 or 10 minutes. Check Facebook or whatever. Wipe it down after a bit with a clean cloth:

Now, all I need to to do is wait until tomorrow to cover with spar varnish. I'll add that picture later.

eddiemac
eddiemac's picture

Thanks. Now I understand your process.

Bill
Bill's picture

Very nice TY !!

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

Eddiemac,

I posted it because it is something anyone can do. It's not rocket science; just a bit of fun.

When cutting wood for finishing, maybe save a few scraps, so you can experiment with different colors. You may be suprised by what some colors look like. 

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

OK, here's the final product.

Bill
Bill's picture

Looks beautiful !!!!

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

I don't take the time for fine woodworking any more, because I always have so many other things to do, I try to rush my jobs. With the quality of the stuff you do, Bill, I'll bet that if you find the right boring wood, make something, and play with the tone and color, it will be museum quality.

Wolfe
Wolfe's picture

Well,

my first small side table from some cedar on the property!

 

eddiemac
eddiemac's picture

Very nice!  Love the gloss finish.

Bill
Bill's picture

Pretty darn fancy Wolfe nice job of finishing yes

Wolfe
Wolfe's picture

Thanks guys!

I am now turning my own legs and we will see how the next "bigger" table looks!

As a side note, looks like I will be very busy as we connected with a group who have been clearing a right of way and gave us some logs. Last count, we transported about 125 logs (Red Oak, White Oak and Pine) to our farm. Time to sharpen some blades...lol

 

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

Good eye for what a slab can be.You really brought out the grain, too, making it look fantastic!

Wolfe
Wolfe's picture

Appreciate it!

I actually cut the board in two, flipped it around and joined it together. Then used epoxy with color to fill in the voids. After, I varnished it with about 5 coats.

eddiemac
eddiemac's picture

Here's a table from red oak. The table legs were my first major turning project with my newly purchased, 70's era, Delta lathe. I learned alot, and have much further to go, especially with the skew chisel. 

Bill
Bill's picture

A skew takes a bit to master Eddie . Nice job on the table and legs yes.

eddiemac
eddiemac's picture

Thanks. Each leg was made from five boards laminated to make a 4 1/2" x 4 1/2" post. It's hard to keep an oak 4x4 from splitting.

wayne busse
wayne busse's picture

 Beautiful table Eddie, I'll bet it was tricky to route the end grain without burning it.  We gave up cutting 4 by 4 hard wood and do glue up like you did.

eddiemac
eddiemac's picture

Thanks, Wayne. The end-grain at table edge   -    I just made sure to rout in two passes, with a shallow one to finish up. Sanding took care of any problem areas remaining. Hey, how about some pics of projects made from your native lumber? This thread belongs to everybody.

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture
Sometimes for end grain, if I'm worried about it splitting or burning, I take some really coarse sandpaper on a palm sander, or a block, and make the round-over that way. Finish with smoother sandpaper. A bit more work, but with a little practice, you can get a really good radius that is clean.
Bill
Bill's picture

Not some made from the mill but on wood from it , birch . Not much I can do with my hands as they are so thought I'd try wood burning bought a $20 kit & burned this bear . Was't sure how it would turn out so never really had a good piece of wood but I like it so now have to figure oy how to deal with the pics edge. I was cutting out some birch burl bowl blanks and instead of sticking the left over in the fire going to give them to a lady I know that does stained glass. Just stuck the bear pic it temperarily for the pic.

Bill
Bill's picture

To practice when I first got the kit I copied these pics off the internet for ideas what animals look like ( good at copying just not out of my head). The bear is an exception because I have so many bear pics and drawn many in the past.

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture
I've tried wood burning, and my weak attempts all ended up in the fireplace. Even if you are using an image from somewhere else, that takes skill. Good use of the wood.
DavidM
DavidM's picture
I like the blue - it’s kinda like using a different colored wood to make a Dutchman instead of cutting out the defect. Please post pics of the finished product. It’s gonna look good!
DavidM
DavidM's picture
Oops posted in the wrong place somehow 🤓
DavidM
DavidM's picture
Oops posted in the wrong place somehow 🤓

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