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Ezsaw
Ezsaw's picture
New member here looking at buying a os27 mill

I have been wanting a mill for year. And after running my brother in laws old Norwood I have desideed with the frontier os27. 

Ezsaw
Ezsaw's picture

What log rule does most of you use to estimate board feet? Thanks

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

Scribner is most common here. Do you have Norwood's calculator? I find it a great tool; my phone is Android.

Ezsaw
Ezsaw's picture

I did download the app. The scribner is the middle of the road Iwould say. But then I read  that the International can be a little mere accret. Thanks for the info.

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

Log scale depends on where you are and how you are using it.  For buying or selling logs, Scribner is common in the Northwest, Doyle more often used for hardwoods.  Doyle underestimates board footage for small logs until they get up to about 20" diameter, then overestimates.  The idea was that bigger logs are more valuable to the sawmill, so this puts a premium on them while paying the same amount per bd ft on the Doyle.  International 1/4 scale is designed to be accurate for circle saws that take a 1/4" kerf.  I've found that band sawmills produce about 12% higher than the International 1/4, and use that if I want to estimate how many board ft a log will yield (handy for estimating cutting jobs).

Ezsaw
Ezsaw's picture

Thanks for the info. It is very helpful. I'm in northern Wi.  most likely I will be estimating jobs for people. Do you just use the international or do you add the 12%? 

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

If I'm estimating for a customer how much the logs will yield, I add the 12%, but if the logs have a lot of defect-- especially sweep-- I back it off.  You might start out at a lower percentage until you have more experience.  I've never had a customer complain about getting more than expected.  I charge $60/hour, so the customer can save some if he/she helps, and there is more incentive to provide a loader on the site to get the logs on the sawmill.

Ezsaw
Ezsaw's picture

What size mill do you run.? The so 27 is a small size mill. Don't know what to charge if I even get a customer.

 

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

I have an HD35, no hydraulics.

munmin
munmin's picture

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MarkK
MarkK's picture

The international 1/4" or Scribner are the fairest and both very close with the International being the most accurate. Doyle is also commonly used ( by Timber/log Buyers. It severely under-scales small diameter logs but is close to International and Scribner on the larger diameters. Note the 1/4" designation 0n the log rules apply to the standard 1/4" saw kerf of the typical circular mill. ( Not something we Norwood owners suffer with! ) Also the typical lumber buyer of green lumber from these mills require a thickness for a 1" board of 1 1/8". Also note that the log rules are based on 4/4 lumber yields. SOOO if you are cutting thicker boards ( 5/4 6/4 8/4 etc. You will have an overrun contributed to the wood not lost in each kerf NOT taken plus some also for the oversized ( extra 1/8" typically required to sell green lumber to a wholesaler. Keep in mind the log rules are for the perfectly straight and round logs. A slight sweep ( curve/bow) or crook will reduce the yield probably more than you would think. Hope this all helps. Forester Mark

MarkK

hypnos97
hypnos97's picture

hi all
I enjoyed this topic. Thanks for the helpful information