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kirk
kirk's picture
Putting my lm29 Mill to a Heavy load

My son brought me some logs from work 3 pine logs at 28" diameter a hemlock log and 2 red oak at 28" diameter. all clear logs straight and no knots, they were going to grind them to make mulch. So i put the the red oak on and started to quarter saw my first hardwood and i like medullary rays it brings out the beauty in the wood. One think about oak its heavy needed a little hydraulic muscle. I attached a few pictures will have more to show when finished.

Bill
Bill's picture
Beautiful logs Kirk , envious :o) I think you find hemlock isn't a light weight as well .
retiredJack
retiredJack's picture
You sure got some nice logs in that haul. Sure helps to have a loader handy for the big ones. enjoy the milling
r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture
Yeah, you're having fun! I've cut some large white oak on my LM29, and it was a ton of work; you are right about needing the hydraulic muscle. I didn't have that but wished I did.
eddiemac
eddiemac's picture
Nice score. Looks like the log could fall off the side in the 4th picture. Ever had that happen?
r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture
Good comment, Eddiemac! For anyone with a mobile mill, I've learned (from experience) about that, so I have a 2" pipe I stick in the top of the leg for the trailer, so the logs can't roll off (again).
DavidM
DavidM's picture
Beautiful log!!! Lots of hard work but you’re gonna get some really good lumber out of it to make it all worthwhile. Have fun and be safe.
kirk
kirk's picture
No Eddiemac never had that happen, but putting a big log on my lm29 i can not lock the log in the threaded handle will not let the sawhead legs go by, So it is a challenge on trying to lock that log in.
eddiemac
eddiemac's picture
I know what you mean - had that problem several times with the big 'uns. When I turn logs with my tractor, I wrap a chain (hook into log) around it and lift against the log posts with the lifting point directly above the log. Never tried it with the tractor back from the log.
Bill
Bill's picture
I just stick a wedge under them so they can't roll back Kirk there so heavy the saw doesn't move them and it's pulling towards the stops.
wbrent
wbrent's picture
How easily does it cut through logs that big? What size engine do you have? I have the LM 29 with 14 hp Kohler. When I get anything beyond 18-20" diameter its a slow slow cut. Sometimes I feel like im over extending the mill. Groans and shakes pretty good. Especially if putting the log on the mill it bumps the track out of alignment. Then its actually hard to push. Maybe I'm still trying to go too fast. I'm used to cutting smaller stuff. I'm trying to secure some large Elm that a friend had cut down from his yard. Gonna be some large pieces. Just paranoid Im gonna damage the mill.
eddiemac
eddiemac's picture
I have a LM2000 with a 15HP Kohler. The big ones do slow you down, but it should not be impossibly slow. A few things to note: is the throttle fully engaged when sawing and the clutch not slipping? Is the blade sharp and, if old, has it been sharpened and set appropriately for the wood you are cutting? I occasionally get pretty fierce head shake on some logs. Then I have to slow the push to a speed where it's just tolerable. Likewise, always listen to the motor and slow the push to where it just starts to bog down. Most cutting problems are due to the blade, but really hard (and dry) woods can also be to blame. Small motor users have a disadvantage, but we can still get the job done.
r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture
Here's a couple hints from someone that has cut a few big logs on his LM29 (https://photos.app.goo.gl/MaWxRsn6CHxhSFiS9): Make certain your RPMs are up (like Eddiemac says). I have added a tach/hour meter to mine, and I had to modify the instructions a bit to get it running at 3200 to 3400 with the handle fully depressed. Make certain the blade is clean. If the wood is pitchy or full of sap, use a good lubricant (I use pine sol mixed with simple green and cut 1/2 with water). When you are cutting wide lumber, fit a couple wedges in behind the cut. If the cut pinches the blade any, it can really cut down on how much of your power is actually cutting. Don't have a set speed; listen to the engine. If it starts lugging, slow down a bit. If you slow down and it still lugs, then something is holding the blade, so you may need to wedge it a bit more. If you are cutting into knots, or wild grain, go slow. The change in grain can grab the blade if you are pushing too much, and make the cut rise or fall. Not only does this make the boards less desirable, but it causes the blade to do a lot more work. The blade should be riding in front of the back ridge on the blade guides. If it starts pushing against the back of the guide, then there is the risk the guide is pushing the blade, and then the front of the blade may rise or fall more easily.
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