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Bill
Bill's picture
some wood for Baron

Tree Removal in Seattle

The tree had Dutch Elm disease, and had to be taken down.

Here's some nice wood. Years ago I worked for a guy with a crane and he started takeing on big trees to fall my job was to hang from the ball with no safety line just hand on to the cable and saw once at the top start cutting off chunks of the tree and let them fall.

https://vimeo.com/81240461

wayne busse
wayne busse's picture

Bill, you've aged a lot in three years, must be the stress.

Bill
Bill's picture

Wayne this vid is the new way they do it when I was in my 30 tys the only safety was hand on is sure didn't do it for long the guy running the crane was not very proficent .

wayne busse
wayne busse's picture

That had to be scary, even when you're strapped in , your hind- brain is screaming "I'm going to die" , loudly.

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

Hope they were able to salvage some lumber from it.  A bit large, even for Baron, but I bet he'd figure out a way to get it on his sawmill.

Baron
Baron's picture

Bill that is a wonderful video. Thanks you for posting it. I've done that. never again though; Doug Firs in Henderson Grove, Elms and Cottonwoods in Denver and Giant Sycamore and White Oak in Bucks Co., PA. It is Young man's work. There is a restaurant I eat at in Lafayette CA whose Bar is Siberian Elm. I hope they are able to slab this tree.

DPForumDog
DPForumDog's picture

I am curious about using wood from an Elm uffering from Dutch Elm Disease,

We bought our land about 5 years there was a dead elm still standing but it was very dead.  We cut it down about a year ago and milled it.  It been sitting behind the batrn for a year and we decided to make a vanity out of it.   We cooked the Elm at 130F for a couple of hours.   Then my son made me 4 table legs on a CNC lathe.  It looks good but it does show evidence of the disease like some holes and  and maybe it  is a little softer than normal. but it did survive a CNC mill and it seems very stout. 

 

My question: Is it okay to use?

Will the elm furniture made from disesed wood last as long as other elm furniture?

Will cooking it for 3 hrs kill the disease?

Are there any other repercussions I havent thought about?

 

Thanks

Granny DPDP ForumDog 

Baron
Baron's picture

I wouldn't worry at all about the disease as it is a vascular disease, spread by beetles, and lives in the outer layers of Cambium and xylem and floem cells. Its not harmful to you. The fact that the tree died from Dutch Elm proves that the disease is already widespread in your area. There are millions upon trillions of egg laying and hungry beetles in your area and they won't choose your table for dinner. Any decay and or degradation or discoloration is caused by other incidental pathogens and conditions such as conch or bacterial wetwood. Furthermore, these beetles only infest live trees. The disease is only active in living cells. Mill'em and enjoy'em as they're going away fast.  

I'd worry more if you see PA Dutch People like me mulling around your property. Elm is so pretty. Cut it thick.

zehrbrox
zehrbrox's picture

ouch that hurts about the dutch, by the way is that wood free lol. is dead elm hard to mill and what would a sawer use it for?  i have a decent one hear on the farm and prob more on our other lands? just never thought as it to cut,  great burning though!

wayne busse
wayne busse's picture

Well, which one? Is it American elm or red elm? Red elm was used to build covered bridges here in Indiana. The wood is light but tough and insect resistant. American elm or as we call it piss-elm, is stringy and hard to split. It makes pretty furniture, but don't let the tree stand dead for very long or it will rot all the way up the tree.

wayne busse
wayne busse's picture

.

DPForumDog
DPForumDog's picture
We ended up using the old elm (probably american) that was huge and appeared to have succumbed to dutch elm disiease. It milled fine. We actually turned 4 fancy legs, but the disease (or old age) caused pits in the wood. I decided i liked the pits as it added charm.The vanity ended up beautiful.
Bill
Bill's picture
A pic would be nice :o)
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